Friday, August 27, 2010

Right Old Ding-Dong

It's Friday! And lo and behold, it's still raining. It's a long weekend here, the Notting Hill Carnival invades my 'hood this weekend with the obligatory pissing and vomiting, and, well, I'm feeling quite brain-dead these days. So I offer you up a few funny words and phrases for your own entertainment!

Your level of hilarity will probably depend on if you're British or not, since most of the expressions I find amusing are British. If you are British (or Irish! -- for Niamh, Brigid, Barbara, Ann, Ellen and any other lovely Irish people I've forgot), please feel free to chime in with your own!

Argy-bargy: A lively discussion.

Ding-dong:Similar to the above, but more aggressive. As in: David Cameron had a right old ding-dong with Her Majesty (not really, but it's kind of funny to picture).

Got the hump: If you get the hump with someone, you're annoyed with them.

Luvvly-jubbly: Means 'lovely'. I detest this one! If you've ever watched Jamie Oliver, you know this expression. It was made popular by the TV show Only Fools and Horses, which always seems to be on telly at any given moment in time.

Off your trolley: Bonkers! Incidentally, 'trolley' also means 'shopping cart'.

There you are! Some funny word combos to get you through to the weekend.

Any entertaining regional expressions in your part of the world?

61 comments:

  1. Oh, lord, I hate 'luvely-jubbly' too. Makes me feel a little bit queasy inside!

    I think you might have mentioned this one before, but I always enjoy hearing someone refer to a 'chin wag' (chat). Ah, so fun.

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  2. The only one of these I've heard before is "off your trolley"---but I LOVE 'got the hump!' (such a different meaning than I thought it would be ;)

    luvvly-jubbly is rather wordy, and ugly...when a simple lovely would do.

    Have a wonderful weekend. (Stay away from the yack and piss.)
    Love,
    Lola

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  3. I'm with Lola--I like "got the hump"! So funny.

    There are many Southern idioms, but I'm blanking on them all right now...

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  4. I try not to use these expression because many wont understand them but I know in Canada there are things we use that the rest of the world shake their heads at.

    1) double double (most know what that means in Canada)
    2) loonie
    3) toonie
    4) eh?

    CD

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  5. Ah, pissing and vomiting. I'll be round shortly.

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  6. Ohwww I loved those, and JAmie does say that a lot! You know what that doggy remembered me of? Churchill, from the comercials!

    "Oh, yes!" He's so adorable!

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  7. I have a thingme jig.
    Do you want a butchers?

    Hey you are a fruitloop. Oh don't get a cob on.
    I am chuffed to bits, I bet you're gobsmacked.

    I have something but I can't remember its name. Do you want a look?
    You a crazy person. Oh don't have a tantrum.
    I am thrilled and I bet you are speechless. :)

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  8. These weren't in vogue when I was living in England. :)

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  9. LOL! "Got the hump" is hilarious. I like "off your trolley," too. I just like the word trolley! It sounds so cute and charming.

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  10. Blimey! You have got your knickers in a twist. Sounds like a bit of a rumble going off at your gaff.

    ;-)

    Bon weekend!

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  11. Argy-bargy...got the hump...too much. I've heard off your trolley here in the US, it's similar to off your rocker.

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  12. These are fun. The Notting Hill festival sounds interesting too, except for the vomiting. I can think of expressions but they seem common to me, like everyone would know them, so I won't mention them but my favorite is Rock on!

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  13. Heehee. I've always love "got the hump." Some of my friends say "They've got the blog on" if someone is annoyed...that always makes me laugh. :)

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  14. Vomiting? Brain dead? Are you being invaded by zombies? LOL.

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  15. Those are such cute sayings! I always thought a Ding-dong was something you could eat!

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  16. Those are amusing!
    Heard the term Jump the Shark? It describes the point in a TV series when it goes downhill.

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  17. All were new to me. Love the ding-dong one - LOL.

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  18. Pissing and vomitting? Now that sounds like something to avoid for sure :) Love the expressions!

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  19. 'Off your trolley' is the only one I've heard of... but I ADORE 'got the hump'

    Excellent to share them! Thanks Talli!

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  20. Ah, it's not a good carnival without some pissing and vomiting. Hope it's all dandy in your neck of the woods!

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  21. I love "chuffed" for when you are really pleased with something. And coming from the NW originally we always used to use the expression "mardy" or "mard-arse" for someone moody and miserable.

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  22. Bit brain dead myself.. thanks for the name check (unless there is another Barbara in Ireland?? - nah, doubt that)...

    My fav (think its local but not sure) is 'banjaxed' as in 'Jaysus I'm banjaxed.. meaning knackered.

    Oh thought of another one - bockety.. meaning ropey, as in nearly broken but not quite... Eg "I have a bockety bike"

    Barbara with her B words...

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  23. My folks grew up in Scotland before moving to Canada - but I don't know these ones! These must be modern ones - I love them! :)

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  24. Not keen on luvely - jubbly either. I live not too far from a festival as well, can smell it :-( Will be even worse by sunday.

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  25. So much more charming than our sayings. We have stuff like 'slammed' (really busy) and 'double wide' (as in a double wide mobile home.)

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  26. Wow. :) I wish I knew more British phrases - I've met a few Brits in France, but not as many as I'd like. Great post!

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  27. Talli, funny post,
    I've been to Notting Hill festival myself, also at the end of the festival you come away deaf.

    As for the vomiting, we Irish would say:
    'You cant hold your drink'

    and you have to be careful at those festivals or they

    'would rob the eye out of your head and come back for the lashes' - beware of pickpocets.

    You have got to come to Dublin for a night out with us Irish girls and hear them for yourself and observe some Irish poets in action.

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  28. Er... banging on about something?
    Er... not give a monkeys?
    And ah... getting sozzled!

    :-)

    Happy Carnival in da hood!

    Take care
    x

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  29. These are great! And I can't think of any for my region... Have a great long weekend!

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  30. Hilarious!! Couldn't stop laughing...gotta love those Brits and you x :)

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  31. These are awesome! And very new to me. "Off your trolley" reminds me of what we say in America, "off your rocker."

    It's raining here in Georgia too, and I realized just a little too late that my car windows were down!

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  32. Mine you'll know being an ole Haligonian.

    'Did ya come on to 'er?' speaking about trying to get an boat engine started or anything really.

    'Stop your whinging and whining - or pimpin' and ballin' '

    'buddy bought it' unknown named fellow died or was murdered

    'tis so beautiful I threw a dollar bill out the window' upon seeing a gorgeous view...

    'what goes around comes around'

    newfie ones I like:
    'who knit ya?' (where are you from)
    'she's flat ass cam dis morn' (it's a calm sea this morning)
    and my fave - said about a certainty 'sure as deres shit in a cat'

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  33. Here in the north we say 'Got a cob on' to mean in a bad mood. I have no idea why! And the locals call each other 'duck'. Thankfully I am not a local!

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  34. Have to say, Argy-bargy is my favourite

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  35. I like that right old ding-dong title!

    Haven't seen Only Fools & Horses but it is a dumb title.

    There are a few American 1's like white on rice & it must be jelly 'cause jam don't shake.

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  36. hmmm, not that I can think of. I usually make up my own. Hahaha, luvvly jubbly sounds like what you would say if you were a fan of...er, larger people.

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  37. I love Anglo-isms! You know though, got the hump in the US would mean something like a quickie...

    I hope the festival doesn't disturb life too much for you, and maybe even gives you a bit of fun.

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  38. Brain-dead...since when? I always read your posts when I need something amusing! I adore you. :P

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  39. I'm originally from Yorkshire so we have quite a lot that most people don't understand! I've been in Shropshire for more than 20 years and I still say, 'Ee, by gum'
    And, 'Where there’s muck, there’s brass.'

    x

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  40. I like these! I didn't know any of them, though the Jamie Oliver one sounds familiar. Since I used to watch his show years ago, I'm sure it's from that.

    Good luck with the carnival. Sounds like FUN.

    We had rain and it was cold for four days straight, but it finally changed to sun.

    I'm sure you've heard all of the US ones.

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  41. Toy are more than welcome to send some of your over here to California. We are having a very dry season. ~Ron

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  42. Ah missed you and your blog!!! How is your book going?!?!?! did you get all the editing and revising done??? Ha, and I'm gonna tell my sister that she's "off her trolley, then call her my lovvly-jubbly". I usually caller her my love-dub... but i like that better haha. :)

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  43. Annoyed? Wow, I'm glad you told me what it really means because...well anyways. ;)
    I've for sure heard of the trolly one though. I like it!

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  44. Hi Talli .. some of these are wonderful English expressions .. but some I detest (like you!!) .. eg Luvvly Jubbly - awful ...

    Thanks for that cheering list .. I remember the days of Notting Hill Carnival invading my 'hood .. long long ago .. it kept me secure in situ - or well away! People love it though .. and have such fun with their floats etc ..

    Great - enjoy the sunnier days .. Hilary

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  45. How about "Well 'ard" for tough or nasty or "Got his grump on"?

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  46. Not sure if this is appropriate, but a friend's sister recently said to her, "If I didn't know you better I'd say you were nobbing someone." Apologies if it isn't!

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  47. I don't think there's ever been a time when Only Fools & Horses hasn't been on the tv in the past 20 years or so.

    Have a fab weekend.

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  48. These are too funny! I remember hearing (on Supernanny, of all shows) the word "trolley" in place of shopping cart. I thought that was cute.

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  49. I love all these and I'm sure if my brain was in gear I'd be able to share some gems from Lancashire. Alas.

    I do love 'He's a sandwich short of a picnic' as in he's got a few brain cells missing. A bit like me at the moment... :)

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  50. I think my area of the US is most famous for saying "fixing to" -- as in, "about to." "It's fixing to rain."

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  51. I've worked with people from across the Pond, and sometimes wondered what the heck language they were speaking. They told me it was English, but I had my doubts LOL! Good people just the same, and fun to go out and have a beer with. Thanks for the clarification on some of these terms.

    Stephen Tremp

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  52. Well, I need to watch BBC America more often because I haven't heard any of those!

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  53. These are such fun! Your weekend sounds like it was probably a lot of fun too :)

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  54. Very entertaining Talli. 'Strewth, we just shoot the breeze with idioms til the cows come home so I'm hard put to think of anything, fair dinkum I reckon..:)

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  55. There are too many Scottish ones to mention so I'll only give you one

    Eejit - which means idiot

    C x

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  56. These are great! Here in the U.S. I use dilly-dally, lallygag, and goof off (all related to my procrastination habit).

    Patricia

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  57. How about an 80's term - "Barf me out!" If you can't guess, it means you think something's gross. Oh, is "gross" American? Disgusting.

    Anywho, glad to have discovered your blog via KarenG's Blog BBQ. I'm double excited to become a follower before your drawing Sept 30 - I want that London travel guide, I'm coming in February!!!

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Coffee and wine for all!